16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Annunciation by Anastasia Romanovna (back)

Annunciation by Anastasia Romanovna (back)

16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery. Pereslavl-Zalessky Historical, Arhitectural and Art Museum- reserve. Gonfalon “The Annunciation” and “the great martyr Nikita Pereslavskiy” double sided work of arts and crafts, Moscow. Workshop of Anastasia Romanovna, middle of the XVI century. Material – silver thread, damask, canvas, silk thread, thread spools, metal, gas, facial sewing, ornamental sewing. Size – 90 x 97.5 Date – mid XVI. Gonfalon was donated Nikitsky monastery town Pereslavl wife of Ivan the Terrible VI – Queen (tsarina) Anastasia Romanovna in 1556 and, made by the tsarina herself.

Annunciation by Anastasia Romanovna. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Annunciation by Anastasia Romanovna. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Pereslavl-Zalessky Historical, Arhitectural and Art Museum- reserve. Gonfalon “The Annunciation” and “the great martyr Nikita Pereslavskiy” double sided work of arts and crafts, Moscow. Workshop of Anastasia Romanovna, middle of the XVI century.

Epitaphios (Ipatyevsky). Shroud. Moscow. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Epitaphios (Ipatyevsky). Shroud. Moscow. The end of the XVI century. Contribution of Tsarina Irina Fedorovna Godunova. Ipatiev Monastery (the image can be enlarged)

Epitaphios by Euphrosyne of Staritsk. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Epitaphios by Euphrosyne of Staritsk. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Entombment. Shroud. 1561 The contribution of the local prince Vladimir Andreyevich Starytsky and his mother Efrosinia. (Fragment)

Feodor and Irina (1592). 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Feodor and Irina (1592). 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Great Martyr Fedor Stratilat and Irina, 1592, Moscow. Damask, gold, silver and silk thread; Sewing. Acquired in 1922 from military Chesmenskaya almshouses of Emperor Nicholas I through State Museum Fund. Was used in the iconostasis, made by the order of Tsar Fedor Ivanovich and Tsarina Irina Fedorovna. In the XVII century iconostasis was kept in the Moscow Kremlin, and then in the Winter Palace in St. Petersburg, since 1812 – in the Church of the Nativity in Chesmen Palace. Restored in 1938, in the State Museum Fund by A.N. Suvorov.

Feodor of Rostov. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Saint Feodor of Rostov. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Hodegitria by Anastasia Romanovna (back). 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Hodegitria by Anastasia Romanovna (back). 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Pereslavl-Zalessky Historical, Arhitectural and Art Museum- reserve. “Hodegetria” and “the great martyr Nikita Pereslavskiy” double sided work of arts and crafts, Moscow. Workshop of Anastasia Romanovna, middle of the XVI century. Material – silver thread, damask, canvas, silk thread, thread spools, metal, gas, facial sewing, ornamental sewing. Size – 65 x 65 Date – mid XVI century. Gonfalon was donated to Nikitsky monastery of Pereslavl by the wife of Ivan IV – Queen Anastasia Romanovna in 1556 and, made ​​by the queen herself.

Hodegitria by Anastasia Romanovna. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Hodegitria by Anastasia Romanovna. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Krest (Sergiev Posad, 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery)

Krest (Sergiev Posad, 16th c.)

Maria and Sergius of Radonezh (Sergiev Posad)

Maria and Sergius of Radonezh (Sergiev Posad). 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

The appearance of Our Lady to Sergius and holidays. Shroud. 1525. Contribution of Grand Prince Vasily III and Grand Duchess of Solomon. 1525. Material: Velvet, damask, silk, silver and gold thread. Storage: Sergiev Posad State History and Art Museum-Reserve. Origin: From the Trinity-Sergius Lavra. Size: 108 x 114. Restored in 1958 in the State Museum Fund by MP Riabova and TA Danilova. The origin of shroud is described in the ancient monastic documents – 1673 contribution book (p. 47-47), Inventory 1641 (p. 126), 1701 Inventory (p. 154). At the centerpiece the Virgin Mary is depicted with the Apostles John and Peter Sergius of Radonezh and his disciple Micah. Embroidered on the rims holidays and saints “The Annunciation”, John Chrysostom, Virgin Bogolyubskaya with praying before her Metropolitan Peter, Old Testament “Trinity”, John the Baptist, the Archangel Gabriel and “Christmas”, etc. Workshop: grand Duchess Jurevna of Solomonia, XVI century.

Murom pokrov. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Murom pokrov. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Nikita Stolpnik (pokrov)

Nikita Stolpnik (pokrov). Workshop of tsarina Anastasia Romanovna. 1555-1560

Pelena by Anastasia Romanovna. Cross at Calvary. Shroud. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Pelena by Anastasia Romanovna. Cross at Calvary. Shroud. 1550 Contribution of tsarina Anastasia Romanovna. Sergiev Posad

Shroud 'Martyr Irina' Russian Orthodox Shroud. Moscow. 1598 - 1604. Workshop of Irina Godunova. Sewing. Moscow. 1598 - 1604. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Shroud ‘Martyr Irina’ Russian Orthodox Shroud. Moscow. 1598 – 1604. Workshop of Irina Godunova. Sewing. Moscow. 1598 – 1604. Cyril-Belozersky monastery

Pokrov by Anastasia Ovinskaya.jpg

Pokrov by Anastasia Ovinskaya, 1514

Vasily of Pariya

Vasily of Pariya. 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery

Theodosia Poulopos - Epitaphios - 1599

Theodosia Poulopos – Epitaphios – 16th-century Russian orthodox embroidery. Tapestry icon with gold embroidering depicting the Entombment of Christ (Epitaphios)

A time intensive but stunning technique used on many images of the saints during the latter 16th century is single bullion strand laidwork couched down with a single strand of silk thread. It produces a shot thread appearance that is both rich and textured in appearance, especially under direct light. All the surviving examples of this technique were used for in ecclesiastical garments. In period red was the favored color for most of these silk threads and garments. Even to this day, red colloquially means “beautiful” to all Russians.

wiki/Category:16th-century_Russian_orthodox_embroidery