Russian figure skating history

Russian figure skating history

Russian figure skating history

In support of the Russian Olympic figure skating team – Interesting facts from the figure skating history. To glide on skates our ancestors learned three thousand years ago. The front part of ancient skates was decorated with horse (‘kon’ is the Russian word for ‘horse’) head. That’s how the Russian word “kon’ki” (skates) got its name. Originally skates were made ​​from animal bones. Skates made of bones, and decorated with horse heads were found during excavations in the villages and cities of ancient Rus – Staraya Ladoga, Novgorod, Pskov.

Russian figure skating history

ancient skates

The ancient skates had three holes – two for attaching the toe to skate shoes and one to hold the ridge at the heel. Because of the lack of freedom of movement such skates have long been considered something of a children’s fun. Only with the invention of wooden skates, which fasten the bottom metal skids, skating on the ice became easier.

Russian figure skating history

Russian figure skating history

Tsar Peter I perfected the design of skates – the world’s first blade rigidly connected with shoes, skates were nailed directly to the boots. Rare celebrations passed without skating. Over the past four centuries wooden base skate and runner basically changed only in its length and shape.

Russian figure skating history

St. Lidwina that fell on the ice (1498). In the background skater riding on one leg – by this time pointed iron skates were already known.

You probably remember the line from “Eugene Onegin”: “The joyful boys cut loudly ice with skates”, where Pushkin leaves us a living proof that people had fun on the ice at the beginning of the XIX century. By the time of Pushkin existed the textbook for skaters – “Winter fun and skating art”, Its author was GM de Pauli – gymnastics teacher in military educational institutions of St. Petersburg.

Russian figure skating history

Artist Nina Sergeyeva ‘Young figure skaters’

In 1877, an ice rink in the Yusupov garden moved from ownership h Yacht Club property in a small circle of admirers istyh skating art. Here then was born St. Petersburg Society of Amateur Skating , which was destined to play a prominent role in the development of figure skating in our country . It was at the rink Yusupov Garden in 1896 , the first world championship in figure skating .

Russian figure skating history

Rink in Yusupov Garden, St. Petersburg, Russia

Konstantin Somov. Winter. Rink. 1915

Konstantin Somov. Winter. Rink. 1915

Russian figure skating history

Participants of the first World championship in men’s figure skating, 1896, St. Petersburg, Russia

Alexander Nikitich Panshin

Alexander Nikitich Panshin

Alexander Nikitich Panshin became the first Russian champion in figure skating. Started skating at 39 years old, a unique athlete retained the league title from 1897 to 1900

Russian figure skating history. Nikolai Panin

Nikolai Panin

Nikolai Panin – Olympic champion, medalist of the world (1903) and Europe (1904, 1908). Five-time champion of Russia (1901-1903, 1905, 1907).

Russian figure skating history

Figures ‘drawn’ with ice skate blade by Nikolai Panin

Russian figure skater, winner of the European and World Championships, was inaccessible in the competition for the best performance of so-called special figures. Skaters themselves charted complex patterns and then used them on the ice. Figures proposed to Jury of Olympics by N. Panin were so original, beautiful and complex. When Russian skaters still drew them, it was well-deserved award a gold medal – the first in the history of the national sport in general.

Nikolai Panin - Russian figure skating history

Nikolai Panin – Olympic champion, medalist of the world (1903) and Europe (1904, 1908). Five-time champion of Russia (1901-1903, 1905, 1907)

Nikolai Panin - Russian figure skating history

Nikolai Panin – Olympic champion, medalist of the world (1903) and Europe (1904, 1908). Five-time champion of Russia (1901-1903, 1905, 1907)

Russian athlete, figure skating coach, teacher, PhD (1938), Honored Master of Sports (1940), Nikolai Panin – real name Kolomenkin, appeared under the pseudonym “Panin” at the international competitions, “Panin” was later added to his surname. Born in the village of provincial Voronezh region. Graduated from high school, Physics and Mathematics Faculty of St. Petersburg University (with honors). Enthusiastically engaged in sports. At the age of 25 (1897) was the winner of the competition in skating with “figures”, organized by the Petersburg society of amateur skating.

Russian figure skating history

Postage stamp dedicated to the first Olympic champion of Russia

Russian figure skating history

Gold coin of series ‘Olympic Century Russia’ dedicated to Nikolai Panin. ‘The first gold medal. London’. 50 rubles. 900 Au, 7.78 g

Russian figure skating history. P. Chernyshev

P. Chernyshev

Russian figure skating history. R. and A. Gandelsman

R. and A. Gandelsman

Russian figure skating history. T. Granatkina, Tolmachev

T. Granatkina, Tolmachev

Leaders of Soviet figure skating of pre-war years were R. and A. Gandelsman, P. Chernyshev, P. Orlov, R. Novozhilova, S. Glaser, K. Likharev, T. Granatkina, Tolmachev, who later as trainers have made a significant contribution to the development of the national figure skating.

Group of talented Soviet trainers

Group of talented Soviet trainers – SA Zhuk, IB Moskvin, TN Moskvina, AN Mishin, TA Tarasova, NI Dubova, EA Tchaikovskaya

Group of talented trainers, whose high-class effort created invincible domestic school of figure skating – SA Zhuk, IB Moskvin, TN Moskvina, AN Mishin, TA Tarasova, NI Dubova, EA Tchaikovskaya

Lyudmila Pakhomova and Alexander Gorshkov

1976 Olympic champions Lyudmila Pakhomova and Alexander Gorshkov

Irina Rodnina, Alexej Ulanow

Irina Rodnina, Alexej Ulanow

Pair skaters Alexei Ulanov – Irina Rodnina represented the Soviet Union, they are the 1972 Olympic champions and four-time (1969-1972) World champions

Elena Vodorezova, 1976

Elena Vodorezova, 1976

Elena Vodorezova became the first Russian skater, who won prizes at world and European championships. Vodorezova is a five-record champion. She is the first woman in the history of figure skating, performed the triple jump in the short program and three triple jumps in the free skate.

Alexei Yagudin

Alexei Yagudin

Russian figure skater Alexei Yagudin is the 2002 Olympic Champion, a four-time World Champion (1998, 1999, 2000, 2002), a three-time European Champion (1998, 1999, 2002), a two-time Grand Prix Final Champion (1998-1999, 2001-2002), a World Junior Champion (1996) and a two-time World Professional Champion (1998, 2002).

Evgeni Plushenko - the most successful athlete in figure skating.

Evgeni Plushenko – the most successful athlete in figure skating.

Evgeni Plushenko is the 2006 Olympic gold medalist, 2014 Olympic team gold medalist, 2002 Olympic silver medalist, and 2010 Olympic silver medalist, a three-time World champion (2001, 2003, 2004), a seven-time European champion (2000, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2012), a four-time Grand Prix Final champion (1999–2000, 2000–01, 2002–03, 2004–05), and a ten-time Russian national champion (1999–2002, 2004–06, 2010, 2012–13). Plushenko is the only male figure skater in the modern history of the sport to have won four Olympic medals competing in four Olympics: 2002 Salt Lake Winter Olympics, 2006 Turin Winter Olympics, 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, and 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics.

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